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SEMINARS WITH LAMA VAJRANATHA—TEACHING SCHEDULE FALL 2014


Teaching Retreats with Lopon Tenzin Namdak Summer-Fall 2014:

Lama Vajranatha will be present at these two retreats in Europe:

July 27-August 15, 2014

The European Retreat with Lopon Tenzin Namdak in France
Shenten Dargye Ling, near Saumur, Loire, FranceAdvanced Dzogchen Teachings from the final section ofr the Zhang-zhung Nyän-gyüd with Lopon Tenzin Namdak. Additional teachings with Khenpo Tenpa Yungdrung.
Info : www.yungdrung-bon.net. Contact: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Advance notice of attendence suggested.

September 18-23, 2014

“Dzogchen Teachings from “The Golden Instructions of Drenpa Namkha”
with Lopon Tenzin Namdak and Khenpo Tenpa Yungdrung.
Buddhasweg Seminar Centre, south of Frankfurt, Central GermanyContact: Dorothea Mihm, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .
Advance notice of attendence suggested.

Info : www.yungdrung-bon.net. Contact: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Teaching Seminars and Retreats with Lama Vajranatha

September 12, 2014

Dzogchen and the Nature of Mind--What is Dzogchen?
Pommeranian Library, Szczecin, Poland  [Evening talk]
Dzogchen, meaning "the Great Perfection", is traditionally regarded in the Nyingmapa school of Tibet as the ultimate teaching of the Buddha regarding the nature of mind and consciousness, surpassing the teachings of both Sutra and Tantra. It teaches the Path of Self-Liberation, and reveals an unconditioned state ever-present beyond the processes of transformation as taught in Tantric practice. This evening talk will survey the three series of Dzogchen practices that lead to the self-discovery of this primordial state of enlightened awareness.

Contact: Wojtek and Bartek: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

September 13-14, 2014

Dzogchen Meditation Practice in terms of the Three Statements of Garab Dorje

Kunzaning Ling Center, Szczecin, Poland [Weekend seminar and meditation workshop]
According to the Nyingmapa school of Tibetan Buddhism, the teachings of Dzogchen, “the Great Perfection,” were first expounded by the Buddhist Mahasiddha Garab Dorje in the country of Uddiyana, which in ancient times lay to the northwest of India. This tradition of Buddhist teaching, which directly introduces the meditation practioner to the Nature of Mind, was transmitted to India by Manjushrimitra and Srisimha and later to Tibet by Guru Padmasambhava, Mahapandita Vimalamitra, and the Tibetan translator Vairochana. The essence of  Garab Dorje’s presentation of the precepts of Dzogchen practice was distilled in his last testament, “The Three Statements that Strike the Essential Points.” In the 19th century, the famous Buddhist master from Eastern Tibet, Patrul Rinpoche, wrote a brilliant commentary on these three statements, together with some of the practices relating to them, entitled “The Special Teaching of the Wise and Glorious King.”
Dzogchen, which teaches the Path of Self-Liberation, is traditionally regarded in Tibet as the highest and most profound teaching of the Buddha. Dzogchen teachings and practice have been preserved until the present day, especially among the Nyingmapa and Kagyüdpa schools of Tibetan Buddhism. In terms of meditation practice, Dzogchen distinguishes between "the mind", or the normal thought process that is cyclical and samsaric in nature, and "the Nature of Mind", which is the primordial state of enlightenment in the individual, which lies beyond all time, conditioning, and causality. Although inconceivable by the finite intellect and inexpressible in words, as the very ground of our existence as living beings, this Natural State of the Nature of Mind can be directly encountered within our immediate experience. By way of direct introduction by the Lama and meditation practice, this primordial, yet ever-present, state of Buddhahood, which resides at the very core of every individual living being, is revealed like the brilliant face of the sun in the sky when the dark clouds of ignorance and delusion are dissipated. This seminar will focus on the translation of the root text of Patrul Rinpoche and its autocommentary as providing a doorway for entering into the meditation practices of Dzogchen.
Contact: Wojtek and Bartek: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

September 26, 2014

Tibetan Healing Practice with White Tara
Sambhala Center, Budapest, Hungary [Evening talk and meditation practice]
Along with the Buddha Amitayus and the goddess Vijaya, White Tara is especially associated in the Tibetan tradition with the practices of long life, as well as with healing practices in general.  Some of these healing practices connected with the white form of Tara will be examined and taught in this evening session, including Tse-drub in order to heal oneself and Tse-wang in order to heal others.

September 27-28, 2014

Long Life Practices with Buddha Amitayus from the Chimed Sogthik
Sambhala Centre, Budapest, Hungary  [Weekend meditation workshop]
At the Maratika cave in the high mountains of of Nepal, the Buddha of long life, Natha Amitayus in union with his consort Guhyajnana Pandaravasini, appeared to Guru Padmasambhava and his consort, the princess Mandarava. Amitayus granted them his blessings and bestowed upon them the long life empowerments, so that they both came to realize the Vidyadhara stage of the power of long life (tse-wang rig-dzin). In the 19th century, the great Tantric practitioner and discoverer of hidden treasure texts, Düdjom Lingpa, recovered these practices known as “the Long Life Practices of the Undying Life-Force (tse-drub chi-med sog-thik).” In the next century, his reincarnation, Düdjom Rinpoche, composed commentaries and taught the practices extensively. Beside the basic method for invoking the long life energies of Natha Amitayus, there are the concealed sadhana practice for activating the five chakras and the rite for the cheating of death. This seminar will look into and engage in some of these practices.
Contact: Sambhala Center, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

October 4-5, 2014

The Wealth and Protection Practice with Mahakala as a Meditation Deity
Sambhala Center, Budapest, Hungary  [Weekend meditation workshop]
In all the schools of Tibetan Buddhism, Mahakala, “the great black one,”is regarded as among the most impotant of all the Dharmapalas, or Guardian Spirits of the Buddhist Teachings and its practitioners. This terrifying divine figure, who destroys demons and demolishes and dissolves obstacles, may either function as a Yidam, or meditation deity, or as a Sungma, a guardian and protective spirit for the teachings and for the practitioner. As a meditation deity, he is regarded as a wrathful emanation of the great Bodhisattva of compassion, Avalokiteshvara, who adopts this ferocious guise when peaceful methods fail to subdue and transform the obstacles and threats emanating from negative energies. On Saturday, the focus will be on the White Mahakala for the wealth practice that comes through the lineage of Shavaripa in India and Khyungpo Naljor in Tibet. On Sunday, the focus will be on protection practice associated with the Six-armed Mahakala coming from Taranatha..
Contact: Sambhala Center,   This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

November 7, 2014

Padmasambhava and the Mahayoga Tradition of the Nyingmapa School of Tibet
Houston, Texas  [Evening talk and meditation practice]
In the 8th century of our era, Guru Padmasambhava not only introduced the teachings and practices of Dzogchen into Tibet from India, but also those of the Tantra system in general, in particular, what is known as Mahayoga Tantra. This corresponds to the class of Anuttara Tantra found in the Sarmapa, or later New Tantra system. The Old Tantra system of the Nyingmapa school distinguished between the Mahayoga, the Anuyoga and the Atiyoga Tantras, preserved both as a continuous uninterrupted transmission (kama) and as hidden treasure texts (terma). The Mahayoga is further divided into the Tantra Section, consisting of eighteen major Tantras, and the Sadhana Section for the practice of the eight Herukas, or wrathful deities (drubpa kabgyäd). Padmasambhava largely taught Dzogchen in the context of Mahayoga practice. This survey and discussion will conclude with a short Guru Yoga practice for Padmasambhava, this practice being essential for both the transmission of Dzogchen and Tantra.

Contact: Jigme Dorje, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

November 8-9, 2014

The Assembly of the Vidyadharas: Practice of the Inner Sadhana of the Longchen Nyingthik of Tibet
Houston, Texas  [Weekend meditation workshop]
In Tibet in the 14th century, Longchen Rabjampa revived the earlier Dzogchen practice of Nyingthik, “the Essence of the Mind,” compiling the original texts into a number of collections. His later successor Jigmed Lingpa in the 18th century, during his retreat in the Chmphu cave near Samye monastery, by way of a series of visions, encounterd Longchenpa, who bestowed upon him the inner meaning of these teachings. Consequently, this tradition became known as the Longchen Nyingthik, “the Essence of the Mind of Longchenpa.” The sadhana practices in this tradition are classified as outer, inner, secret, and most secret. The inner sadhana for Deva Yoga, the male aspect of enlightenment, is known as “The Assembly of the Vidyadharas (Rigdzin Düpa).” A Vidyadhara, or Rigdzin, is so called because such an individual is a holder of and has realized the esoteric knowledge of the Secret Mantras of the Buddhist Tantra system. The practice here focuses upon the three aspects of the Guru, who is accompanied by the eight Vidyadharas signifying the meditations of the Mahayoga Sadhana practice. Transmission and instruction include the simplified form of the sadhana, or transformation practice.
Contact: Jigme Dorje, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

November 14, 2014

The Practice of Dakini Yoga: The Feminine Side of Buddha Enlightenment
Houston, Texas  [Evening talk and meditation practice]
The Dakini, or Khandroma, literally “she who moves through space” or “she who goes in the sky,” is a manifestation of energy in female form. There are worldly Dakinis who are human beings such as female spiritual teachers, or else witches possessing psychic powers, but also non-human Dakinis such as goddesses and nature spirits in female form. In addition, there are Wisdom Dakinis who are transcendent or beyond Samsara and represent the manifestations of enlightened awareness in female form, such as the female Buddha Tara. More generally, in terms of Tantric Buddhism, the Dakini represents the feminine principle that is outside the control of patriarchal society and the rational male ego consciousness. For this reason, the Dakini may be represented as alluring and enchanting, but also as wrathful and terrifying and dangerous to men.

Contact: Jigme Dorje, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

November 15-16, 2014

The Practice of Kurukulla—The Dakini of Enchantment and Witchcraft
Houston, Texas [Weekend meditation workshop]
It is said that the Wisdom Dakini Kurukulla originated in the Central Asia country of Uddiyana to the northwest of India, where she appeared in visions to the king Indrabhuti.  Her name is translated into Tibetan as Rigjyedma, “she who is the cause of knowledge.” She early became very popular and remains so even today among the Tibetans because of her associatetion with the magical function of enchantment and attraction (wanggi thinlay), or the bewitching of beings in order to bring them under one’s power. More than any other figure in the Buddhist pantheon, she becomes the Buddhist goddess of love and sex, much like the Western goddesses Aphrodite and Venus. She is depicted as a naked, voluptuous, and seductive sixteen year old girl, holding attributes suggesting her powers, such as an iron hook of attraction, a noose to bind others to her will, and a flower-entwined bow and arrow. But as a goddess of witchcraft, she is also akin to Diana. It is she who brings all those beings who are otherwise difficult to subdue under her power. But she is not a worldly goddess; rather she is an emanation of the female Buddha Tara in her red form and, therefore, she represents the expression of the enlightened awareness and skillful means of a Buddha. This seminar will look into the meditation and ritual practices of the Dakini Yoga associated with Kurukulla, the Wisdom Dakini of enchantments and witchcraft, who comes when invoked from the mystical realm of Khechara, the land of the Dakinis in the West. For this purpose, we rely on the profound expositions of Düdjom Rinpoche, as well as Jamgön Kongtrul and Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo regarding the practices for this Wisdom Dakini
Contact: Jigme Dorje, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

December 7, 2014

The Oral Tradition of Zhang-zhung: An Introduction to Bönpo Dzogchen Teachings
Gyalshen Institute, San Pablo, Bay Area, California  [Sunday seminar]
Unlike the other traditions of Dzogchen found within Bön, the Zhang-zhung Nyän-gyüd represents a continuous and unbroken transmission from earliest times of the precepts of Dzogchen coming down to our own time. These teachings and practices were transmitted by the enlightened master Tapihritsa to his disciple Gyerpung Nangzher Lödpo at the Darok Lake in the 8th century in Zhang-zhung, or Northwestern Tibet, at that time an independent kingdom with its own language and religious culture. But the ultimate source of the Dzogchen teachings are said to be far more ancient, extending back to the Primordial Buddha, Kuntu Zangpo himself. These represent upadeshas, or secret oral instructions, only put into writing much later. They speak of an unconditioned state of being and awareness beyond the Tantric process of transformation. This refers to the Natural State of the Nature of Mind, one’s own innate Buddha Nature that is beyond time, conditioning, and causality. This seminar will survey the teachings, literature, and practices found in this oral tradition from the land of Zhang-zhung.
Contact: Mark Hammons, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

December  13-14, 2014

Vajrakilaya Practice according to the Nyingmapa Tradition

Brooklyn, New York City [Weekend meditation workshop]
In his heart, an enlightened being like the Buddha or a Great Bodhisattva, is calm and totally compassionate. But in order to subdue and transform negative energies and evil spirits, especially those that arise directly from the poisonous passion of anger, it is necessary on occasion for a compassioante enlightened beings to display a wrathful face and form and engage in wrathful actions. Thus, when the demon sorcerer Rudra threatened to enslave and even extingish nascent humanity in prehistoric times, the great Bodhisattva Vajrapani adopted this exceedingly terrifying form of Vajrakilaya in order to subdue Rudra and his minions. The demon Rudra symbolizes the inflated ego and the evils it causes. In general, the function of Vajrakilaya practice is to overcome obstacles and demolish negative energies afflicting the life of the individual practitioner. These methods include the higher spiritual practices (stod-las) for attaining liberation and enlightenment and the more practical ritual actions (smad-las) for transforming negative energies in everyday life. For the overcoming and subduing of demons, evil, spirits, and negative energies generally in his own time, it is said that Vajrakilaya was the personal meditation practice of Guru Padmasambhava himself, as well as that of his consort, the Tibetan princess Yeshe Tsogyal, who wrote the first Tibetan commentary on this practice. Vajrakilaya has become among the most widespread and popular Terma cycles in Tibet today among both monks and Ngakpa Lamas of the Nyingmapa tradition. This seminar will introduce some of these practices for Vajrakilaya according to the Düdjom Tersar, in particular, the sPu-gri reg-phung, “the Razor that Destroys at a Touch.”
Contact: James Bae, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

January 2-3-4, 2015

The Practice of Vision in the Dzogchen Tradition of Tibet
Maria Lankowitz (Near Graz), Austria  [Weekend seminar and workshop]
In the tradition of the Nyingmapa school of Tibet, there exist three series of Dzogchen teachings: the Mind Series (semde), the Space Series (longde), and the Secret Instruction Series (mangagide). The first series mainly focuses on how to find oneself in contemplation, or the Natural State of the Nature of Mind. The principal method employed here is Zhine, or fixating the mind on a single object of meditation, at first something visual or visualized, and later on an enpty location in space without an object. The emphesis here is on Kadak, or the primordial purity of the state of contemplation, and this is also called Trekchöd, the total relaxation of all one’s rigidities and tensions of body, speech, and mind. The second series focuses on remaining in contemplation and eliminating all doubts regarding it nature, principally through sky meditation. The third series assumes one knows how to get into conteplation through whatever means and then the emphasis is on Lhundrub, the spontaneous, visible manifestations of energies potential within the Nature of Mind. Released from the overlay of obscurations, these manifest as visions. In turn, these develop until they become integrated into the Clear Light of Reality. This seminar will examine these three approaches to the practice of contemplation, known as Dzogchen Desum.
Contact: Enrico, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Last Updated on Thursday, 24 July 2014 13:26
 

June 7, 2014

Practices with the Wisdom Dakinis Simhamukha and Kurukulla

Brooklyn, New York [Saturday afternoon seminar]

Wisdom Dakinis represent energy in female form, but they are not worldly goddesses and spirits who are still caught up in Samsara, the cycle of rebirth. Rather, they are manifestations of wisdom and enlightened awareness, being emanations from female Buddhas such as Samantabhadri and Tara. Wisdom Dakinis may be fierce and wrathful such as the lion-headed Simhamukha, who subdues and transforms negative energies and whose special function is the averting and repelling of magical and psychic attacks. Or they may be joyous and seductive like Kurukulla, who attracts and magnetizes beings, bringing them under her enlightened power. In this seminar, we shall look into some of the protection methods and defenses against psychic and magical attacks associated with these two Wisdom Dakinis.

Contact: James Bae, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

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April 4, 2014

Spirit and Soul in Tibetan Buddhism and Western Thought

Pomeranian Library, Szczecin, Poland  [Friday evening talk]

The Western understanding of the spirit and the soul is generally perceived in the Christian context. However, the Christian tradition arose from out of two sources. the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament on the one hand and Greek philosophy, especially Platonism and Stoicism on the other. But one must ask what is spirit and what is soul? Is the soul torn between worldly desires of the flesh pulling it downward, and the spiritual aspiration for salvation and heaven calling it upward? How does this view compare with the perspectives of the Buddhism of Tibet, which is often thought to deny the existence of a self and a soul? Buddhism represents a spiritual path to liberation and enlightenment, but what role does the native Tibetan shamanic concept of the soul play in this context. The two great spiritual traditions, Christianity and Buddhism, provide a fruitful dialogue that address the fundamental and ultimate questions that face human life and existence.

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April 5-6, 2014

“Buddha Without Meditation” according to Dudjom Lingpa

Szczecin, Poland  [Friday evening talk]

The famous text known in Tibetan as the Nang-jyang, “The Purification of Appearances,presents the view of Dzogchen through the approach known as Trekchöd, “cutting through rigidities.” The 19th century dzogchen and tantric master, Düdjom Lingpa (-) received these teachings in visionary experiences where he entered into a dialogue with fourteen enlightened beings, including Avalokiteshvara, Vajrapani, Longchenpa, and Saraha. The Düdjom Tersar lineage is based upon Termas, or reediscovered trasure texts attributed to Guru Padmasambhava in the 8th century CE. In his next reincarnation as His Holiness Düdjom Rinpoche (1904-1987), later head of the Nyingmapa school of Tibetan Buddhism, the transmission of these Termas were widely propagated among both Tibetans and Westerners in the modern world. This seminar taught by a direct Western disciple of His Holiness will explicate and elucidate some of the issues raised in this text.

Contact: Wojtek and Bartek: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

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April 26-27, 2014

Advanced Vajrakilaya Practice according to the Dudjom Tersar Tradition

Sambhala Center, Budapest, Hungary  [Weekend meditation workshop]

His Holiness Dudjom Rinpoche, Jigdral Yeshe Dorje (1904-1987), during the latter part of his lifetime the Supreme Head of the Nyingmapa School of Tibetan Buddhism, was one of the greatest masters of Dzogchen and Buddhist Tantra in Tibet in recent times. Rinpoche was not only an accomplished Tantric Yogi and Terton (discover of hidden treasure texts), but a profound scholar of the Buddhist tradition of Tibet. Born in Southern Tibet, he was recognized as a reincarnation of one of the original twenty-five disciples of Guru Padmasambhava who established Vajrayana, the Tantric form of Buddhism, in Tibet in the 8th century of our era. The hidden treasure texts, or Termas, discovered by Dudjom Rinpoche and his previous incarnation, Dudjom Lingpa, are collectively known as Dudjom Tersar, “the New Treasures of Dudjom.” They particularly focus upon the practices associated with Phurpa or Vajrakilaya, “the diamond-like magical three-bladed dagger,”which overcomes and destroys demons and obstructing spirits, especially as represented by the Rudra demons of inflated ego.

In general, the function of Phurpa practice is to overcome obstacles and demolish negative energies afflicting the life of the individual practitioner.

These methods include the higher spiritual practices (stod-las) for attaining liberation and enlightenment and the more practical magical ritual actions (smad-las) for subduing and transforming negative energy in daily life. This course will introduce some of these ritual practices for Vajrakilaya according to the Dudjom Tersar, in particular, the sPu-gri reg-phung, “the Razor that Destroys at a Touch.”

Contact: Sambhala Center, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

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May 2-3-4, 2014

Dzogchen Meditation Practice according to the Three Statements of Garab Dorje

Maria Lankowitz, near Graz, Austria

According to the Nyingmapa school of Tibetan Buddhism, the teachings of Dzogchen, “the Great Perfection,” were first expounded by the Buddhist Mahasiddha Garab Dorje in the country of Uddiyana, which in ancient times lay to the northwest of India. This tradition of Buddhist teaching, which directly introduces the meditation practioner to the Nature of Mind, was transmitted to India by Manjushrimitra and Srisimha and later to Tibet by Guru Padmasambhava, Mahapandita Vimalamitra, and the Tibetan translator Vairochana. The essence of  Garab Dorje’s presentation of the precepts of Dzogchen practice was distilled in his last testament, “The Three Statements that Strike the Essentials.” In the 19th century, the famous Buddhist master from Eastern Tibet, Patrul Rinpoche, wrote a brilliant commentary on these three statements, together with some of the practices relating to them, entitled “The Special Teaching of the Wise and Glorious King.”

Dzogchen, which teaches the Path of Self-Liberation, is traditionally regarded in Tibet as the highest and most profound teaching of the Buddha. Dzogchen teachings and practice have been preserved until the present day, especially among the Nyingmapa and Kagyudpa schools of Tibetan Buddhism. In terms of meditation practice, Dzogchen distinguishes between "the mind", or the normal thought process that is cyclical and Samsaric in nature, and "the Nature of Mind", which is the primordial state of enlightenment in the individual, which lies beyond all time, conditioning, and causality. Although inconceivable by the finite intellect and inexpressible in words, as the very ground of our existence as living beings, this Natural State of the Nature of Mind can be directly encountered within our immediate experience. By way of direct introduction and meditation practice, this primordial, yet ever-present, state of Buddhahood, which resides at the very core of every individual living being, is revealed like the brilliant face of the sun in the sky when the dark clouds of ignorance and delusion are dissipated.

This seminar will focus on the translation of the root text of Patrul Rinpoche and its auto-commentary as providing a doorway for entering into the meditation practices of Dzogchen.

Contact: Enrico, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

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May 9-10-11, 2014

Dakinis and Guardians

Munich, South Germany  [Weekend meditation workshop]

Everywhere through out the Buddhist world, practitioners of this tradition take refuge in the Buddha, the Dharma, and the sangha. However, one does not take refuge in the worldly gods, though one might otherwise propitiate them, because they are still caught up inside Samsara, the beginning-less cycle of death and rebirth,, and therefore do not know the means and way to attain liberation from Samsara. However, in the Tantric Buddhist tradition of Tibet, there is also the inner refuge, firstly in the Guru, or spiritual teacher,  secondly to the Yidams or meditation deities, and thirdly to the Dakinis and the Dharmapalas. A Dakini is a manifestation of energy in female form. So, there are Worldly dakinis, such as goddesses and witches,but beyond them there are Wisdom Dakinis, such as Vajravarahi, Simhamukha, Kurukulla, and so on, who are not worldly beings inside Samsara but manifestations of enlightened awareness. Included with the dakinis in this third refuge are the Dharmapalas, or Dharma Protectors. In the same way, there are Worldly Guardians, gods and spirits that have been subdues by Padmasambhava and other masters, who have placed them under strict vows to henceforth protect the Dharma and its practitioners. But there are also Transcendent Guardians who are manifestations, usually in wrathful forms, of the compassion of enlightened beings, the Buddhas and the great Bodhisattvas, in order to subdue and protect against evil spirits and negative energies, such Guardians as for example as Mahakala and Ekajati. This seminar will focus on the rituals and magical practices connected with the Wiusdom Dakinis and the Guardians.out

Contact: Benno, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Last Updated on Saturday, 24 May 2014 11:56
 

 

SEMINARS WITH LAMA VAJRANATHA—FALL SCHEDULE 2013


Teaching Retreats with Lopon Tenzin Namdak Summer-Fall 2013:
Lama Vajranatha will be present at these two retreats in Europe.

July 21-August 8, 2013

The European Retreat with Lopon Tenzin Namdak in France
Shenten Dargye Ling, near Saumur, Loire, France
Advanced Dzogchen Teachings from the Zhang-zhung Nyän-gyüd with Lopon Tenzin Namdak. Additional teachings with Khenpo Tenpa Yungdrung.
Info : yungdrung-bon.net
Contact: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Advance notice of attendence suggested.

September 13-17, 2013

Ying-Rig Dzö: Dzogchen Teachings of Shardza Rinpoche with Lopon Tenzin Namdak,
Buddhasweg Seminar Centre, south of Frankfurt, Central Germany
Contact: Dorothea Mihm, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Advance notice of attendence suggested.

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October 12-13, 2013

Magical Attraction Practices with Kurukulla and Mahadeva
Sambhala Center, Budapast, Hungary [Weekend workshop]
In the Higher Tantras of Tibetan Buddhsim, known as Anuttara Tantra, there are four principal kinds of magical activities, corresponding to the colors white, yellow, red, and green. Nevertheless, in each case in terms of Buddhism, the motivation of any Trinlay, or magical action practice, is always Bodhichitta, or compassion for all sentient beings and the desire to release them from their suffering experienced in Samsara. Vashikarana, or red magic, functions to attract, overpower, and magnetize whatever obstacles may appear on the spiritual path. These are then brought under one’s power and transformed into helpers and benefactors. Kurukulla, the Wisdom Dakini of Enchantment and Witchcraft, is the patroness of such magical activity and she is assisted in this by the Guardian deities Mahadeva and Uma. This seminar will examine and practice some of these methods associated with the sadhana for Kurukulla and the invocations of Mahadeva.
Contact: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ; martihum@ gmail.com

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December 6-7-8, 2013

Protection Practices with the Wisdom Dakinis Simhamukha and Kurukulla
München, South Germany  [Friday night talk, weekend seminar and workshop]
Wisdom Dakinis represent energy in female form, but they are not worldly goddesses and spirits who are still caught up in Samsara, the cycle of rebirth. Rather, they are manifestations of wisdom and enlightened awareness, being emanations from female Buddhas such as Samantabhadri and Tara. Wisdom Dakinis may be fierce and wrathful such as the lion-headed Simhamukha, who subdues and transforms negative energies and whose special function is the averting and repelling of magical attacks. Or they may be joyous and seductive like Kurukulla, who attracts and magnetizes beings, bringing them under her enlightened power. In this seminar, we shall look into and practice some of the protection methods and defences against psychic and magical attacks associated with these two Wisdom Dakinis.
Contact: Benno, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Last Updated on Friday, 27 September 2013 10:00
 

SEMINARS WITH LAMA VAJRANATHA
Spring SCHEDULE   2013

February 23-24, 2013

Kurukulla—The Dakini of Enchantment and Witchcraft

Budapest, Hungary  [Weekend meditation workshop]

The Dakini or Khandroma, literally “she who moves through space” or “she who goes in the sky,” is a manifestation of energy in female form. There are worldly Dakinis who are human beings such as female spiritual teachers or else witches possessing psychic powers, but also non-human Dakinis such as goddesses and nature spirits in female form. In addition, there are Wisdom Dakinis who are transcendent or beyond Samsara and represent the manifestations of enlightened awareness in female form, such as the female Buddha Tara, or female Bodhisattvas such as Lakshmi and Sarasvati, or Guardians in female form like Ekajati. In the Tantric Buddhism of Tibet, the Dakini embodies the Wisdom Principle of Buddha enlightenment, for which reason she is said to be the Consort of all the Buddhas. More generally, in terms of Tibetan Buddhism, the Dakini represents the feminine principle that is outside the control of patriarchal society and the rational male ego consciousness. For this reason, the Dakini may be represented as alluring and enchanting, but also as wrathful and terrifying and dangerous to men. This course will look at the meditation and ritual practices associated with Kurukulla, the Dakini of enchantments and witchcraft, coming from the mystical land of Uddiyana, the land of the Dakinis. It is she who brings all those beings who are otherwise difficult to subdue under her power.

This course will survey the importance of the Dakini Principle in the Higher Tantra practice of Tibetan Buddhism and introduce some of the ritual and meditation practices connected with Dakini Yoga of Kurukulla. For this purpose, we rely on the profound expositions of Jamgön Kongtrul and Jamyang Khyentse regarding the practices for this Dakini who is a manifestation of enlightened awareness, as well as the ritual text of the Kurukulla Kalpa.

Contact: Sambhala Centre, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Marti, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

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March 1-2-3, 2013

Magical Practices with Vajrakilaya and Simhamukha

Rangsher Ling Ngakpahaus, Lahr, South Germany [Weekend workshop]

The ultimate goal of Buddhist spiritual practice is liberation from suffering in Samsara and the attaining of Buddha enlightenment. But until that ultimate goal is attained after the course of many lifetimes, the individual practitioner must deal with the practical problems of this present life on earth. Therefore, in terms of the Buddhist tradition, there are many secondary practices in relation to the meditation deities Vajrakilaya and Simhamukha, especially those from the Dudjom Tersar lineage of the Nyingmapa school of Tibet, which deal with such problems as healing, life extension, prosperity, fending off attacks of negative energy from enemies and spirits, and so on.

His Holiness Dudjom Rinpoche, Jigdral Yeshe Dorje (1904-1987), during the latter part of his lifetime the Supreme Head of the Nyingmapa School of Tibetan Buddhism, was one of the greatest masters of Dzogchen and Buddhist Tantra in Tibet in recent times. Rinpoche was not only an accomplished Tantric Yogi and Terton (discover of hidden treasure texts), but a profound scholar of the Buddhist tradition of Tibet. Born in Southern Tibet, he was recognized as a reincarnation of one of the original twenty-five disciples of Guru Padmasambhava who established Vajrayana, the Tantric form of Buddhism, in Tibet in the 8th century of our era. The hidden treasure texts, or Termas, discovered by Dudjom Rinpoche and his previous incarnation, Dudjom Lingpa, are collectively known as Dudjom Tersar, “the New Treasures of Dudjom.” They particularly focus upon the practices associated with Phurpa or Vajrakilaya, “the diamond-like magical three-bladed dagger,”which overcomes and destroys demons and obstructing spirits, especially as represented by the Rudra demons of inflated ego.

In general, the function of Phurpa practice is to overcome obstacles and demolish negative energies afflicting the life of the individual practitioner. These methods include the higher spiritual practices (stod-las) for attaining liberation and enlightenment and the more practical ritual actions (smad-las) for transforming energy in daily life. The principal function of the lion-headed Dakini Simhamukha is the deflecting and averting (zlog-pa) of magical and psychic attacks. This seminar will examine some of these practices.

Contact: Bran, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

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March 7, 2013

Dakinis--The Feminine Principle in Tibetan Buddhism

Pommeranian Library  [Afternoon lecture, gratis]

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March 9-10, 2013

Practices of the Wrathful Lion-Headed Dakini Simhamukha

Szczecin, Poland  [Weekend meditation workshop]

Generally, in terms of Tibetan Buddhism, the Dakini represents the autonomous feminine principle that is outside the control of patriarchal society and the rational male ego consciousness. For this reason, the Dakini may be represented as alluring and enchanting, but also as wrathful and terrifying. This seminar will look at the meditations, rituals, and magical practices associated with the wrathful lion-headed Dakini Simhamukha, mistress of enchantments, sorceries, and witchcraft, who brings all those beings who are difficult to subdue under her power, and who also vanquishes and subdues all obstacles, negativities, and evil spirits. Simhamukha was the personal practice of Guhyajnana Dakini, the female Guru of Padmasambhava in the Central Asian country of Uddiyana and he introduced the practice into Tibet. She remains a very popular practice in the Nyingmapa school of Tibetan Buddhism. For this purpose, we rely on the profound expositions of Jamgön Kongtrul, Jamyang Khyentse, and Dudjom Rinpoche regarding the practices for this Dakini, who is a manifestation of enlightened awareness.

Contact:  Wojtek and Bartek, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

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March 22-23-24, 2013

Tantra and Dzogchen in the Buddhist and Bonpo Traditions of Tibet

Warsaw, Poland  [Friday afternoon talk, weekend meditation workshop]

Meditation practice has always been at the core of Buddhism everywhere in Asia, and this is also true of the related Bonpo tradition of Tibet. Accordingly, the teachings and the practices revealed by the Buddha may be classified into the three levels of Sutra, Tantra, and Dzogchen, corresponding to the three dimensions of human existence of body, energy, and mind. Sutra is mainly concerned with the nature of human existence in the world, especially one’s ethical conduct and behavior towards other living beings in this present life. Nevertheless, meditation practice at the Sutra level is fundamental and is decidedly psychological in its approach. Tantra is more concerned with the individual’s dimension of energy, that is to say, how to access energy and then how to direct and channel it for specific purposes, such as healing. Dzogchen, however, represents the discovery of the nature of mind in one’s immediate experience at the core of one’s being. All three approaches aim at the attaining of liberation from suffering in Samsara and the realizing of enlightened awareness as the essence of one’s being. We shall investigate the foundations of meditation practice in both the Buddhist and the Bonpo traditions of Tibet and in the weekend workshop the emphasis will be on actual meditation practice.

Contact: Monika, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

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May 10-11-12, 2013

Shamanic and Buddhist Healing Practices in the Traditions of Tibet

München, South Germany  [Friday talk and weekend workshop]

When Indian Buddhism came to Central Tibet in the 7th-8th centuries, it encountered a rich and flourishing religious culture characterized by shamanic practices. The principal function of this Tibetan shamanism was that of healing, especially of the impact upon human beings of negative energies (gdon) and hostile spirits (bgegs) residing in the wild places of nature. Such nature spirits would often become offended and irritated at humans because of their careless or deliberate polluting and dispoiling of the natural environment, which represented the home and residence of these spirits. Being energy beings, these spirits could then impinge upon the the personal energy fields, or auras, of those human individuals who had incured their hostility. Here in this weekend workshop we will principally be concerned with healing meditations and protection practices against negative energies, as well as the use of mantra-infused healing waters and fumigations, drawn from the ancient Tibetan traditions of Buddhism, Bön, and Shamanism.

Contact:  Benno, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 26 February 2013 08:24
 

 

SEMINARS WITH LAMA VAJRANATHA—FALL SCHEDULE   2012

Teaching Retreats with Lopon Tenzin Namdak Summer-Fall 2012:

Lama Vajranatha will be present at these two retreats in Europe.

July 22-August 12, 2012

The European Retreat with Lopon Tenzin Namdak in France

Shenten Dargye Ling, near Saumur, Loire, France

Advanced Dzogchen Teachings from the Zhang-zhung Nyän-gyüd with Lopon Tenzin Namdak. Additional teachings with Khenpo Tenpa Yungdrung.

Info : www.yungdrung-bon.net

Contact: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Advance notice of attendance suggested

September 27-30, 2012

The Seven Mirrors of Dzogchen with Lopon Tenzin Namdak,

Buddhasweg Seminar Centre, south of Frankfurt, Central Germany

Yongdzin Rinpoche, Lopon Tenzin Namdak, the greatest living master of Dzogchen within the Bonpo tradition of Tibet, will teach a retreat in Germany on the ancient text entitled “The Seven Mirrors of Dzogchen,” from the cycle of the Namkha Thrul-dzöd, “the Magical Treasury of the Sky,” by the enlightened Dzogchen master Drenpa Namkha. Having been a master of Dzogchzen meditation practice in both the Bonpo and the Buddhist traditions, and completely rejecting all narrow sectarianism, Drenpa Namkha was among the Twenty-Five Disciples of Guru Padmasambhava in Central Tibet in the 8th century of our era. After having concealed many Terma texts himself dealing with the practice of Dzogchen, this master composed this short text distilling the very essence of all these teachings. Beginning with the qualities necessary in a master and in a student,  the view, meditation, conduct, and result of Dzogchen practice is discussed in lucid detail, as well as providing descriptions of higher states of consciousness and practices in preparation for the Bardo experience after death. During the retreat and based on this text, Rinpoche will provide instructions for the practice of Dzogchen.

Contact: Dorothea Mihm, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

October 6-7, 2011

Magical Practices with Vajrakilaya--Practice Retreat

Sambhala Centrum, Budapest, Hungary

[Practice retreat]

The ultimate goal of Buddhist spiritual practice is liberation from suffering in Samsara and the attaining of Buddha enlightenment. But until that ultimate goal is attained after the course of many lifetimes, the individual practitioner must deal with the practical problems of this present life on earth. Therefore, in terms of the Buddhist tradition, there are many secondary practices in relation to the meditation Deity Vajrakilaya, especially those from the Dudjom Tersar lineage of the Nyingmapa school of Tibet, which deal with such problems as healing, life extension, prosperity, fending off attacks of negative energy from enemies and spirits, and so on. This seminar will examine some of these practices.

Contact: Sambhala Centre, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ; Marti, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

October 13-14, 2012

The Practice of the Female Buddha Tara and Her Twenty-One Forms

Sambhala Centrum, Budapest, Hungary

[Weekend meditation retreat]

The Dakini or Khandroma, literally “she who moves through space” or “she who goes in the sky,” is a manifestation of energy in female form. There are worldly Dakinis who are human beings such as female spiritual teachers or else witches possessing psychic powers, but also non-human Dakinis such as goddesses and nature spirits in female form. In addition, there are Wisdom Dakinis who are transcendent or beyond Samsara and represent the manifestations of enlightened awareness in female form, such as the female Buddha Tara, or female Bodhisattvas such as Lakshmi and Sarasvati, or Guardians in female form like Ekajati and Paldän Lhamo. In the Tantric Buddhism of Tibet, the Dakini embodies the Wisdom Principle of Buddha enlightenment, for which reason she is said to be the Consort of all the Buddhas. More generally, the Dakini represents the feminine principle that is outside the control of patriarchal society and the rational male ego consciousness. This course will survey the importance of the Dakini Principle in the Higher Tantra practice of Tibetan Buddhism and introduce some of the ritual and meditation practices connected with Dakini Yoga.

Contact: Sambhala Center, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ; Marti, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

October 19-20-21, 2012

Padmasambhava, Dzogchen, and Buddhist Meditation

Iserlohn, Central Germany

[Evening lecture, weekend meditation workshop]

Dzogchen, "the Great Perfection", which teaches the Path of Self-Liberation, is traditionally regarded in Tibet as the highest and most profound teaching of the Buddha. Introduced into Tibet in the eighth century of our era by the great Buddhist Tantric master Padmasambhava, who came from the country of Uddiyana in Central Asia, Dzogchen has been practiced until the present day, especially among the Nyingmapa and Kagyudpa schools of Tibetan Buddhism. In terms of meditation practice, Dzogchen distinguishes between "the mind", or the normal thought process that is cyclical and samsaric in nature, and "the Nature of Mind", which is the primordial state of enlightenment that lies beyond all time, conditioning, and causality. Although inconceivable by the finite intellect and inexpressible in words, as the very ground of our existence as living beings, this Natural State can be directly encountered within our immediate experience. By way of direct introduction and meditation practice, this primordial, yet everpresent, state of Buddhahood, which resides at the very core of every individual living being, is revealed like the brilliant face of the sun in the sky when the dark clouds of ignorance and delusion are dissipated. This will be a two-day introductory workshop for Dzogchen and some other methods of Buddhist meditation, including the Guru Yoga of Padmasambhava, with an emphasis on practice and how meditation can be integrated into one's daily life.

Contact: Christoph Tillmann, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , tel. 01702-120786, Reinhold, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

October 26-27-28, 2012

Healing the Soul in Tibetan Buddhism and Shamanism

München, South Germany

[Evening lecture, weekend meditation workshop]

From its very beginning, healing has always been at the heart of Buddhist practice. When Indian Buddhism came to Tibet in the early Middle Ages, it amalgamated with the indigenous healing practices of Bön and Tibetan Shamanism. Sicknesses, whether physical, energetic, or mental could be due to natural causes such as seasonal changes, bad diet, or imbalances in the humors, but indigenous Tibetan traditions emphasized the importance of counteracting negative provocations of energy emanating from the spirits inhabiting the natural environment. Such negative provocations (dön) may be directed at individuals who, for one reason or another, have destroyed or polluted the natural environment which is the home of these spirits. Not only is one’s Tse, or life-force, at risk here from such attacks, but also one’s La, or soul, which serves as the energetic support for the individual’s emotional life. This seminar will examine some of the methods used in Tibetan tradition to defend against attack and heal the La.

Contact: Benno, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

November 9-10-11, 2012

Dzogchen, and Buddhist Meditation

Bielefeld, Central Germany

[Evening lecture, weekend meditation workshop]

Dzogchen, "the Great Perfection", which teaches the Path of Self-Liberation, is traditionally regarded in Tibet as the highest and most profound teaching of the Buddha. Introduced into Tibet in the eighth century of our era by the great Buddhist Tantric master Padmasambhava, who came from the country of Uddiyana in Central Asia, Dzogchen has been preserved until the present day, especially among the Nyingmapa and Kagyudpa schools of Tibetan Buddhism. In terms of meditation practice, Dzogchen distinguishes between "the mind", or the normal thought process that is cyclical and Samsaric in nature, and "the Nature of Mind", which is the primordial state of enlightenment that lies beyond all time, conditioning, and causality. Although inconceivable by the finite intellect and inexpressible in words, as the very ground of our existence as living beings, this Natural State can be directly encountered within our immediate experience. By way of direct introduction and meditation practice, this primordial, yet ever-present, state of Buddhahood, which resides at the very core of every individual living being, is revealed like the brilliant face of the sun in the sky when the dark clouds of ignorance and delusion are dissipated. Here, among the three series of Dzogchen teachings, we shall focus on the methods of Dzogchen Upadesha, with an emphasis on practice and how meditation can be integrated into one's daily life. During this weekened workshop, some of the basic methods of Dzogchen, known as Semdzin and Rushans; will be taught and practiced, which aim at totally relaxing all our tensions and rigidities of body, energy, and mind.

Contact: Miguel, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

November 16-17-18, 2012

Teaching with Lopon Ogyen Tenzin

Sczcecin, Poland

Lama Vajranatha will be in attendence.

Contact: Wojtek and Bartek, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Last Updated on Friday, 20 July 2012 20:00
 

SEMINARS WITH LAMA VAJRANATHA
WINTER-SPRING SCHEDULE   2012

January 14-15, 2012

The Anuyoga Practices of Vajrakilaya:

The Transformation of Bliss and Desire

Sambhala Center, Budapest, Hungary


[Weekend meditation workshop]


The principal meditation practice in the Tantra system of Vajrayana, or Tibetan Buddhism, is that of Sadhana, the process of realization, where, by means of imagination and the power of thought, the practitioner creates and enters into a virtual reality. In the initial visualization process of Mahayoga, higher spiritual energy is invoked to descend and channelled through the archetypal imagery of the Yidam meditation deity and actualized in the sacred space of the Mandala in order to realize concrete results in one’s life. In the perfection process of Anuyoga, the practioner comes to experience what the Yidam in the Mandala is experiencing, that is to say, the Great Bliss of  Mahasukha. Focusing on the the practice of Tummo, the yoga of inner heat, the energy of Anuraga, or sexual passion, as it is experienced by the Yidam, which would normally bind the individual consciousness to rebirth in Samsara, now becomes the very means to the attaining of liberation from Samsara. Relying on the commentaries of the Tantric master Dudjom Rinpoche, in this workshop the previous practices of Anuyoga will be continued and developed further.
Contact: Marti, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , tel. 0036-(0) 70-508-0084.
Contact: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

January 21-22, 2012

The Practice of Mahakala

as Meditation Deity and as Guardian

Sambhala Center, Budapest, Hungary

[Weekend meditation workshop]

In all the schools of Tibetan Buddhism, Mahakala, “the great black one,”is regarded as among the most impotant of all the Dharmapalas, or Guardian Spirits of the Buddhist Teachings and its practitioners. This terrifying divine figure, who destroys demons and demolishes and dissolves obstacles, may function as a Yidam, or meditation deity, or as a Sungma, a guardian and protective spirit for the teachings and for the practitioner. As a meditation deity, he is regarded as a wrathful emanation of the great Bodhisattva of compassion, Avalokiteshvara, who adopts this ferocious guise when peaceful methods fail to subdue and transform the obstacles and threats emanating from negative energies. Functioning as Guardians, there is a group of Seventy-five Nathas, or Gonpos, many of whom belong to the tenth rank among the Dharmapalas.  In this weekend seminar, we will focus on and engage in the practices of the Six-armed Mahakala and the Four-armed Mahakala for protection practice and the White Mahakala for wealth practice that comes through the lineage of Shavaripa in India and Khyungpo Naljor in Tibet.
Contact: Marti, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , tel. 0036-(0) 70-508-0084.
Contact: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

March 1-2-3-4, 2012

Tibetan Dream Yoga Practices

Szczecin, Poland


[Evening talks and weekend meditation workshop]

Dreams are something we experience every night, even if we do not remember them in the morning. Therefore, the first task in dream practice is to recall our dreams the next day. Dreams of clarity are most likely to occur in the morning before we awaken for the day. Sometimes such dreams can foretell future events. In this seminar we will look at the methods used by Tibetan Lamas to induce prophetic dreams by way of the practice of Tara. Moreover, we will investigate the Tibetan methods of Sleep Yoga in order to experience the Clear Light and Dream Yoga in order to experience lucid dreaming. There will be an introductory talk on dreams at the Pomeranian library.
Contact: Wojtek and Bartek, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

March 9-10-11, 2012

Practices of the Wrathful Lion-headed Dakini Simhamukha

Rangsher Ling Ngakpahaus, Lahr, South Germany

[Weekend meditation workshop]

Generally, in terms of Tibetan Buddhism, the Dakini represents the autonomous feminine principle that is outside the control of patriarchal society and the rational male ego consciousness. For this reason, the Dakini may be represented as alluring and enchanting, but also as wrathful and terrifying. This seminar will look at the meditations, rituals, and magical practices associated with the wrathful lion-headed Dakini Simhamukha, mistress of enchantments, sorceries, and witchcraft, who brings all those beings who are difficult to subdue under her power, and who also vanquishes and subdues all obstacles, negativities, and evil spirits. Simhamukha was the personal practice of Guhyajnana Dakini, the female Guru of Padmasambhava in the Central Asian country of Uddiyana and he introduce4d the practice into Tibet. She remains a very popular practice in the Nyingmapa school of Tibetan Buddhism. For this purpose, we rely on the profound expositions of Jamgön Kongtrul, Jamyang Khyentse, and Dudjom Rinpoche regarding the practices for this Dakini, who is a manifestation of enlightened awareness.
Contact: Bran and Regina, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

March 16-17-18, 2012

Tibetan Dream Yoga Practices

Bielefeld, Germany

[Evening talk and weekend meditation workshop]

Normally, we human beings spend at least a third of our lifetime in sleep and dreaming. Nevertheless, it is possible to engage in a dialogue with our dreams, receiving portents of the future, and even to become awake and self-aware in them awake and self-aware in our dreams and experience what is generally known as “lucid dreaming.” Becoming conscious in our dreams without awakening from sleep, we may come to find ourselves in control of our dream and be able to transform it, even practice meditation while asleep and journey in a dream-body to explore other worlds and dimensions of existence. Moreover, dream yoga represents an excellent training to prepare us for dying and the after-death-experience known as the Bardo, where, as is the case with the dream state, we are confronted with our karmic visions as virtual realities. In this course, we shall explore some of the methods found in the shamanistic and tantric traditions of Ancient Tibet, including Dzogchen, used by the Lamas of Tibet to realize lucid dreams and bring about their transformation, which in turn will affect the waking state life and the consciousness of the individual.
Contact: Miguel, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

March 23-24-25, 2012

Dzogchen and the Tibetan Book of the Dead

München, South Germany

[Evening lecture and weekend meditation workshop]

Does conscious existence continue after the death of the material body? The ultimate fact of death faces every human being. Whatever is born will eventually die. All things are impermanent. This truth was taught by the Buddha. Nevertheless, according to this teaching, the death of the brain and the material body is not the end of our conscious existence.  Death is only a passage and a gateway, one stage in our transformations along the journey. The relentless energy of karma inevitaby propels our consciousness into a new embodiment, a new life, in which we experience the consequences of the actions we have committed in our previous lives. These actions in past lifetimes not only determine our future rebirths, but directly continue to effect our health and emotional states in this present life. However, the Buddha also taught a way to free ourselves from the dead-weight of past karma and transcend the beginningless cycle of death and rebirth we know as Samsara. The Tibetan Book of the Dead (Bar-do thos grol) is one of the most profound books to come out of the Dzogchen tradition of Tibet established in ancient times by Padmasambhava. The Dzogchen teachings of Padmasambhava serve both as the philosophical and the practical basis of the Book of the Dead. In this course, we shall look at the questions of death, dying, reincarnation, and purifying past karma in the light of Dzogchen and Buddhist psychology. Some practices in the Dzogchen tradition that relate to preparation for dying and the Bardo experience after will be taught.
Contact: Reinhold, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Last Updated on Tuesday, 24 January 2012 10:09
 

SEMINARS WITH LAMA VAJRANATHA
SUMMER SCHEDULE 2012

May 12, 2012

Tibetan Buddhist Healing Practices

Brooklyn, New York City, USA
[Saturday afternoon seminar, 1-4 pm.]

In the Buddhist tradition, the spiritual work of the practitioner has always been very much concerned with the process of healing the mind and the body, both of oneself and of others. Every Buddhist monk is expected to have some knowledge of medicine and healing practices related to the three dimensions of human existence, namely, body, energy, and mind. Even the Buddha himself was called "the Great Physician" and his core teaching of the Four Holy Truths was cast into the form of the traditional Vedic medical diagnosis and prognosis for an illness. Furthermore, the Buddha expounded an Eightfold Path that represents the process of a cure to the human predicament, a holistic approach to the process of healing the fragmented and alienated psyche, so that the human individual becomes whole again and at peace with oneself and the world. This two day course will focus on certain methods of psychic healing employed in the Buddhist tradition of Tibet, which include the use of guided imagery to access and direct the natural healing energies inherent in every human being. These methods are known as Tsewang or "life-force empowerment" and Tsedrub or "long life meditation," and they represent the principal form of psychic healing employed by the Tibetan Lamas.

Contact: James Bae, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it info: http://www.baeacupuncture.com/Blank-1.html

June 15-16-17, 2012

Dzogchen Meditation Practices

Szczecin, Poland  [Weekend practice session]

Dzogchen, "the Great Perfection", which teaches the Path of Self-Liberation, is traditionally regarded in Tibet as the highest and most profound teaching of the Buddha. In terms of meditation practice, Dzogchen distinguishes between "the mind", or the normal thought process that is cyclical and samsaric in nature, and "the Nature of Mind", which is the primordial state of enlightenment that lies beyond all time, conditioning, and causality. By way of direct introduction and meditation practice, this primordial, yet everpresent, state of Buddhahood, which resides at the very core of every individual living being, is revealed like the brilliant face of the sun in the sky when the dark clouds of ignorance and delusion are dissipated. Continuing from previous retreats, we will investigate and practice various Rushan and Semdzin exercises that assist the practitioner to relax and to discover the Nature of Mind.

Contact: Wojtek and Bartek, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

June 23-24, 2012

Magical Practices with Vajrakilaya

Sambhala Centrum, Budapest, Hungary

The ultimate goal of Buddhist spiritual practice is liberation from suffering in Samsara and the attaining of Buddha enlightenment. But until that ultimate goal is attained after the course of many lifetimes, the individual practitioner must deal with the practical problems of this present life on earth. Therefore, in terms of the Buddhist tradition, there are many secondary practices in relation to the meditation Deity Vajrakilaya, especially those from the Dudjom Tersar lineage of the Nyingmapa school of Tibet, which deal with such problems as healing, life extension, prosperity, fending off attacks of negative energy from enemies and spirits, and so on. This seminar will examine some of these practices.

Contact: Sambhala Center, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

July 6-7-8, 2012

Wrathful Practices of the Lion-Headed Dakini Simhamukha

Rangsher Ling Ngakpahaus, Lahr, South Germany
[Weekend meditation workshop]

Generally, in terms of Tibetan Buddhism, the Dakini represents the autonomous feminine principle that is outside the control of patriarchal society and the rational male ego consciousness. For this reason, the Dakini may be represented as alluring and enchanting, but also as wrathful and terrifying. This seminar will look at the meditations, rituals, and magical practices associated with the wrathful lion-headed Dakini Simhamukha, mistress of enchantments, sorceries, and witchcraft, who brings all those beings who are difficult to subdue under her power, and who also vanquishes and subdues all obstacles, negativities, and evil spirits. Simhamukha was the personal practice of Guhyajnana Dakini, the female Guru of Padmasambhava in the Central Asian country of Uddiyana and he introduced her practice into Tibet. She remains a very popular practice in the Nyingmapa school of Tibetan Buddhism. For this purpose, we rely on the profound expositions of Jamgön Kongtrul, Jamyang Khyentse, and Dudjom Rinpoche regarding the practices for this Dakini, who is a manifestation of enlightened awareness. This seminar represents a continuation of the previous seminar. Here the focus will be on the collection of magical practices (las tshogs) associated with the wrathful lion-headed Dakini Simhamukha, and especially on the Lower Rites (smad-las) for subduing and transforming evil spirits that cause harm, obstacles, and illnesses for individuals.

Contact: Bran and Regina, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Teaching Retreats with Lopon Tenzin Namdak Summer-Fall 2012:

Lama Vajranatha will be present at these two retreats in Europe.

July 23-August 13, 2012

The European Retreat with Lopon Tenzin Namdak in Normandy,  France

Shenten Dargye Ling, near Saumur, Loire, France
Advanced Dzogchen Teachings from the Zhang-zhung Nyän-gyüd with Lopon Tenzin Namdak. Additional teachings with Khenpo Tenpa Yungdrung.
Info : yungdrung-bon.net
Contact: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Advance notice of attendence suggested

September 27-30, 2012

The Seven Mirrors of Dzogchen with Lopon Tenzin Namdak

Buddhasweg Seminar Center, South of Frankfurt, Germany
Contact: Dorothea Mihm, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Last Updated on Monday, 04 June 2012 14:42