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The Practice of the Bonpo Deity Walchen Gekhod, also known as Zhang-Zhung Meri - Notes:
Article Index
The Practice of the Bonpo Deity Walchen Gekhod, also known as Zhang-Zhung Meri
Four Classes of Bönpo Tantras
Gekhöd and Meri
Iconography of Zhang-zhung Meri
Iconography of Zhang-zhung Meri 2
The Mantra Recitation for Meri
The Texts for Zhang-zhung Meri
Outline of the Sadhana Text
The Practice of Sadhana
Notes:
All Pages

Notes:

1. See John Myrdhin Reynolds, The Oral Tradition from Zhang-zhung, Vajra Publications, Kathmandu 2005, pp. 29-78.

2. See Reynolds, The Oral Tradition from Zhang-zhung (2005), pp. 79-106.

3. See Reynolds, The Oral Tradition from Zhang-zhung (2005), pp. 137-150.

4. According to the gSang-ba sngags kyi rnam-par bshad-pa’i mchan bka’ ‘grel gsal-byed (The Clear Elucidation of the Annotations and Commentaries on the Precepts, which Represent a Complete Explanation of the Secret Mantra System) by Yongdzin Rinpoche, Lopon Tenzin Namdak.  A translation of this text is being prepared.

5. Oral communication from Yongdzin Rinpoche.

6. On the mountain god (yul-lha) cult in Tibetan folk religion, see Samten G. Karmay, “Local Deities and the Juniper Tree: A Ritual of Purification,” and “The Cult of Mountain Deities and its Political Significance,” in The Arrow and the Spindle, Mandala Book Point, Kathmandu 1998, pp. 380-412 and 432-450.

7. Phyi  rten dbal gyi g.yag la  babs and nang  rten rin-chen gser la byas.

8. See Namkhai Norbu, “The Bon of Juthig: The Science of Divination,” in Drung, Deu, and Bon: Narratives, Symbolic Languages, and the Bon Tradition in Ancient Tibet, LTWA, Dharamsala1995, pp. 189-198.

9. For more detailed descriptions of Zhang-zhung Meri,  see Per Kvaerne, The Bon Religion of Tibet, Serindia Publications, London 1995 and also John Myrdhin Reynolds,  The Cult and Practice of the Bönpo Deity Walchen Gekhöd, also Known as Zhang-zhung Meri, forcoming from Vajra Publications, Kathmandu.

10. In transliteration: 1. dbal gyi rgyal-po me lha rgyung and sra-brtan-ma, 2. skyel-chen mu-wer and gyer-ting tsa-med, 3. sum-phud rgyal-po and skyed-byed-ma, 4. lig-chen mu-wer and gyer-snyan tsa-med, 5. sku-lha yo-phya and smin-byed-ma,  6. spungs-chen mu-wer and ting-rgyung tsa-med, 7. sku-lha mu-thur and ’degs-byed-ma, 8. srid-pa mu-wer and ring-snyan tsa-med, 9. pus-has dung-rgyung and shugs-sgrol-ma, 10. sku-lha pra-phud and gsod-byed-ma.

11. For a translation of the practices of Nyipangse and Mänmo, see Reynolds, The Oral Tradition from Zhang-zhung (2005), “Appendix Three: The Invocations to the Guardian Deity Nyipangse and to the Goddess Menmo,” pp. 345-365.

12. Me-ri sgrub skor, pp.397-406.

13. See Per Kvaerne, “The Canon of the Bonpos,” in Indo-Iranian Journal 1974, pp. 96-144.

14. rJe rin-po-che mnyam-med shes-rab rgyal-mtshan.

15. See Samten G. Karmay, The Treasury of Good Sayings: A Tibetan History of Bon, Oxford University Press,  London 1972, p. 50.  The list of the eighteen Jyaruchän (bya-ru-can) kings is found in the mTsho ma-pham dkar-chags and quoted in Namkhai Norbu, The Necklace of gZi, LTWA, Dharamsala 1981.

16. See Reynolds, The Oral Tradition from Zhang-zhung (2005), pp. 155-157, 163-167.

17. (1) Zhang-zhung me-ri bka’ gter gnyis kyi sgrub-pa las tshogs bcas-pa’i gsung pod: A Collection of Texts from the Zhang-zhung snyan-rgyud and the re-discoveries of the gTer-ston Khu-tsha zla-‘od concerned with the Propitiation of the Bonpo Deity Meri. Reproduced from the lithograph edition prepared in Delhi c. 1950 by the late Khyung-sprul ‘jigs-med nam-mkha’ rdo-rje. Tibetan Bonpo Monastic Centre, 1973.

(2) gTsang-ma zhang-zhung gi bon ge-khod gsang-ba drag-chen gyi sgrub-pa las tshogs bcas kyi gsung pod: A Collection of Texts from the Termas of  dPon-gsas Khyung-rgod-rtsal. Tibetan Bonpo Monastic Centre, 1973.

18. Me-ri sgrub skor,  pp. 383-396.

19. Oral communication from Yongdzin Rinpoche.